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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q:

Paige, the 4,5 month old. I know there is supposed to be a sleep regression at this age, but she ‘s been doing the same thing for over two months now., where she really struggles to go to sleep at night. Once she falls into a deep sleep about 9/10, she sleeps beautifully for the rest of the night. But we struggle to get her down, and in my attempts to settle her, I’m worried I’m creating bad habits?

A:

Look at her day naps, as if she struggle to fall asleep it could be that she is overtired when going to sleep. It could also be as a result that she is more active, flapping legs and arms at 4,5 months old.

Q:

Should we feed baby until she is drowsy, and should we feed before a nap or after?

A:

When you feed a baby is not a problem. As long as you do not feed a baby until they are asleep, because this will become your baby’s sleep association.

Q:

When is a good time to introduce a bedtime routine?

A:

By approximately 8 weeks of age (for a full-term baby) infants have the capacity to learn from repetition. This means they can learn that a bedtime routine ultimately leads to falling asleep.

Q:

Ella sleeps everyday from 11h30 to 2, but in the last week she has been a big struggle to go down at night. She used to just fall asleep at 7 on her own in her cot. Now screams and shouts non stop till 8H30. She is 21 months old.

A:

Limit her day sleeps to two hours max and move the nap up to 12 or 12H30 so the stretch to bedtime is not so long. If the stretch is too long then they are overtired and the behaviour becomes iritic.

Q:

Sleeping is going very well with the boys. To my great surprise Max has completely accepted his new and has not been getting out of bed at all. He even calls me in the morning because he doesn’t want to leave the bed. Do you have any ideas for how he can know it’s an acceptable time to get up?

A:

You can get a grow clock that changes color as the time passes. If the clock turns green, he is allow to go to your room or get up for the day and get off the bed.

Q:

What might a good bedtime routine entail?

A:

Generally speaking, a bedtime routine should last about 30 to 45 minutes from start to finish. Dinner is not part of a bedtime routine and should be at least an hour before last bottle. Most babies it is effective to kick off a bedtime routine with closing the curtains and getting the night feed ready (if not breastfeeding) and then run the bath as babies love getting naked and taking a warm bath and find it enjoyable and relaxing. It is also a great way to transition from the daytime to the night-time. This routine may include a massage, getting the baby in his or her pajamas, reading or singing a song and feeding. The real key at this point is ensuring that your baby are not fully asleep by the time you put her down in her sleep environment to sleep. It is important that she put herself to sleep the last little bit.

Q:

When should a baby sleep through the night.

A:

As you cannot prevent a human being from waking up at night, the problem is not waking up, but what needs to happen when baby is ready to go back to sleep. From around 16 weeks, babies have the ability to have uninterrupted sleep and link sleep cycles if all needs are met. Remember, for parents of preemies, they should calculate weeks old from their baby’s due date. A small percentage of babies at 4 months continue to need one-night feeding, but generally speaking, they should be able to consolidate their sleep into two long stretches with a feeding in the middle of the night.

Q:

Why is good quality sleep so important for a baby?

A:

A baby’s brain is developing when they sleep. This is when growth hormones are releases and skills and abilities becomes memories. Also during this time the body and mind are restoring. If baby get too little sleep, they get very fussy and become easily over stimulated. There are many longterm negative effects associated with poor sleep habits during childhood.

Q:

Does it matter where a baby sleeps?

A:

Yes, it does. To the extent possible it is best to have your baby sleeping flat on their backs in their beds. The more consistent you are about keeping your child’s sleeping environment the same, the more likely they are to take sleep easily in that place. Going down in a consistent, motion-free spot for sleep as much as possible sends cue to a baby’s brain sleep is to come.

Q:

What is an optimal sleep environment for a baby?

A:

As melatonin, the sleep hormone, release in your body when your body comes into contact with darkness, it is helpful to ensure the sleep environment for baby is as dark as possible. The ideal room temp is between 19 and 22 degrees. A room that has been ventilated to ensure enough fresh air for the night has many benefits. White noise can assist with eliminating any sudden noises. Remove any mobiles or toys from the baby’s cot. This will over stimulate or confuse baby that it’s playtime as opposed to bedtime.

Q:

Does sleep training mean cry it out?

A:

There are sleep training programmes and then is there Mom’s Lifeline Sleep Training programme. We believe in creating an environment that is positive to acquire the skill to learn how to fall asleep with emotional attachment to the parent. As it is difficult to change the current with the new, without some resistance in the form of crying from your baby, we never allow a baby to cry for longer than 3 minutes max without seeing, feeling or hearing their parents. Crying is normal for a baby as it is their communication with parents. It is what we do when they cry, that become the problem.

Disclaimer: This website does not provide medical advice. Always seek the advice of your pediatrician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or the health and welfare of your child.

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